Welcome to the new and improved Wordcrafts. I first launched this site back in 1997 with bad clip art and big ambitions.  My oldest daughter was in diapers and Teletubby love and I had just launched into the brave new world of freelance writing and editing, after leaving my corporate writing job.

Fast forward to today. The oldest is 15 and has won more writing awards than I have. She’ll be competing for shelf space with her sister soon, no doubt, who at 11 is a gifted artist and storyteller in her own right (they do say it’s in the genes).  And after nearly 8 years at the editorial helm of a health media company, I’m back in the freelance game full-time once again. So it was clearly time to update this site.

Check out the portfolio for some samples of my work and a look at the consumer health and parenting books I’ve authored.  I’ve also been a part of the longest running primetime health show in television history, and have won 24 Telly Awards (and an Emmy nomination) in the process. If you need script or health production help, find out more about my experience here. You’ll also find work samples across other industries and audiences (both B2B and B2C). Or contact me directly to find out how I may be able to help you reach your content objectives.

While I’ve created Wordcrafts primarily as a place to show my stuff and generate new business, I also use it to share my passion for writing, publishing, reading, and anything else that strikes a word nerd’s fancy.  Follow me on Twitter @wordcrafting for the latest thoughts on all that jazz and to catch updates on the “Writer’s Only” section of this site.

So no matter why you’ve come to visit, enjoy your stay. And come back often!

~Paula

Wordcrafts' Quotes

Vanity Fair

"A writer who obtains his full purpose loses himself in his own lustre."

— Samuel Johnson

Player Piano

"Grammar is a piano I play by ear, since I seem to have been out of school the year the rules were mentioned. All I know about grammar is its infinite power. To shift the structure of a sentence alters the meaning of that sentence, as definitely and inflexibly as the position of a camera alters the meaning of the object photographed. Many people know about camera angles now, but not so many know about sentences. The arrangement of the words matters, and the arrangement you want can be found in the picture in your mind. The picture dictates the arrangement. The picture dictates whether this will be a sentence with or without clauses, a sentence that ends hard or a dying-fall sentence, long or short, active or passive. The picture tells you how to arrange the words and the arrangement of the words tells you, or tells me, what’s going on in the picture. Nota bene.

It tells you.
You don’t tell it."

— Joan Didion

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